As a teacher, I am deeply interested in the questions that drive each student, as a human, scholar, and artist.  How, in teaching, can I make space for and sustain students’ passions while simultaneously crafting assignments, content, and activities that will train curiosity, rigor, and discipline?

 

Graduate Courses

Click a course title for a brief description.

 

  • Theories of Acting and Directing, University of Pittsburgh

    Students hone, diversify and/or solidify their directing craft through étude staging    assignments and personalized, practical projects designed in consultation with the    instructor. Students engage with foundational director-driven, directing and devising texts in our field, from Brecht, Artuad, and Grotowski to Akalaitis, Bogart,  and others, with particular attention to both practical and pedagogical application as well as critical evaluations of methods, cultural institutions, and representation.

     

  • Performance Studies, University of Pittsburgh

    This seminar addresses theories and methods of performance studies    through a) foundational texts in the field; b) the scholarly, pedagogical and critical    implication of the history and relationship between performance studies and inter-   disciplinary sites; c) recent publications in the field, and d) concerted engagement    with intersections between performance studies, border studies, Latin American and   Latinx theatre and performance.

     

  • Hemispheric Islams, Decolonial Theatre, University of Pittsburgh

    In this seminar, we examine the ways in which “hemispheric”, as an analytical lens, aspires to function, per Taylor (2007) as an orientational and ontological vector, as opposed and in addition to a geographical, locational inquiry. With particular attention to current    engagements with Islamic, Hispanic, Latino/a and African histories in the Americas, we interrogate the ways in which such hemispheric propositions interface with, challenge, resist, and support projects of the decolonial, in theory and in practice

     

  • Contemporary Approaches to Theatre and Performance History in Latin America, University of Pittsburgh

    Cross disciplinary examination of approaches to theatre and performance in the geographies of the Caribbean and Latin America from “before contact” to the present.

     

  • Gender, Race, and Labor in the American Theatre, University of Pittsburgh

    Historiographical exploration of how labor, in theory and materiality, poses problems and opportunities for the theatre and performance scholar and practitioner. Emphasis on the inter-war period in the Americas, language, race and gender.

     

  • Gender, Performance, and the Body in Contemporary Latin America, University of Pittsburgh

    Intersections between performance practice, theatre history and critical theory using representative plays and performances of Chile, Mexico, and Argentina from 1968 to the present.  Reflective explorations of public scholarship, activism, and the academy.

     

     Courseblog

  • Theatre, Performance, and Formations of the “Americas”, University of Pittsburgh

    How performance and theatre contributed to conceptualizations of “America” and “The Americas” in indigenous, European, creole, and mestizo populations from before 1492 to approximately 1720.  Historiographical problems of pre-Columbian performance practice.

     

  • Devising Theatre, Virginia Commonwealth University

    This course will introduce students to practical means of creating original works of performance in response to a prompt, a theme, or a text.  In addition to their practical creative work, students will also engage with international contemporary and historical practices devised theatre.  Graduate students (MFA Performance Pedagogy) and undergraduate students (BFA) will take the class together.

     

    Course Objectives:

     

    • Create original non-script based performance pieces from a variety of sources, as individuals and as members of an ensemble.
    • Be able to work outside of and beyond conventional narrative structure, naturalistic staging, and traditional rehearsal processes.
    • Develop an awareness of the history of devised theatre and current artists: the who, how and where.
    • Cultivate an individual point of view and aesthetic.
    • Express story, action, text and subtext through the body.
    • Consider all elements of performance—space, set, costumes light, words, sound, music, the body, the voice, the audience, rhythm, tempo, image-- as languages in creating theatre pieces.
    • Consider the intersection of self, ensemble and society in devised work and its creation.  That is, how devised work has and does confront social and political issues in addition to, or along with, traditional aesthetic values.
    • Be supportive of fellow artists and respect class as a safe place in which we can experiment and take risks.

     

     

     

Click a course title for a brief description.

 

  • Theatre and the Black Lives Matter Movement, University of Pittsburgh

    A special topics course taught in collaboration with undergraduate teaching  assistants, inspired by and adapted from Prof. Frank Leon Roberts' Black Lives Matter  Syllabus and American Theatre Magazine’s “Ferguson Theatre Syllabus.”  We will engage with contemporary theatrical, political, theoretical and sociological works centered on race in the United States, the Black Lives Matter movement, comrade activism, ally capacity building, global contexts—and the multiple stories contained within and mobilized by each practice, term, discourse.

     

    Theatrical pieces—plays and performance—function as the spine for our work, around which contextual critical and historical works will coalesce. We will actively engage with journalistic and social media, as well as films, music and visual art. We utilize multiple modalities for discussion, communication, response, and dialogue, drawing upon the methods of Augusto Boal, Michael Rohd, and others.

  • First Year Academic Learning Community, Inside the Theatre, University of Pittsburgh

    In this class, first year students with backgrounds and interests in theatre work together to get to know the university, the theatre arts department, and the city of Pittbsurgh through in class activities, guest speakers, and group projects

     

  • World Theatre 1910—1970+, University of Pittsburgh

    World Theatre 1890 – 1970+ is the third in a world history theatre sequence designed to explore the development of dramatic forms, theatre practices, and performance from the 5th century B.C.E. to today.  We examine a range of performance and theatre: butoh in Japan, absurdism in Europe, political theatre in Africa, contemporary multi-media performance in the Americas, and more.  Students evaluate historiographical approaches by analyzing strengths and weaknesses in narration, argument and/or use of evidence and positing alternative approaches.

     

  • Undergraduate Seminar Latin American Theatre, University of Pittsburgh

    We engage with contemporary and historical embodied responses to, representations of, and resistances to conflict, violence, and the state at local, national, and hemispheric levels in Latin America. We will contend explicitly with race, gender, and sexuality.

     

    Theatre and performance –as embodied action, behavior, world-making—function as the objects and subjects of our study, as well as methodology. Students have the option, to engage with material through performance as well as discussion and writing. We work with plays, collective creation, and street performance; we also draw from urban studies, cultural studies, visual studies, historiography, eco-criticism, and decoloniality, with a particular emphasis on moving and thinking from the south.

     

    Students wishing to substitute/work with Spanish, Portuguese or indigenous language materials are encouraged to speak with instructor about doing so.  Final papers may be written in English or Spanish.

  • World Theatre 500BCE to 1640, University of Pittsburgh

    World Theatre 500 B.C.E. to 1640 is the first in a three-part world history theatre sequence designed to explore the development of dramatic forms, theatre practices and performance from the 5th century B.C.E. to today.  We examine histories of theatre and performance (conceptualized broadly) within local and global social, artistic and political contexts, from classical Athens to Edo Japan, pre-Colombian American performance to Shakespeare’s Globe. The course focuses on evidence, interpretation and historical causation. We investigate our material historically as well as historiographically. That is, not only will we acquire content, we will also investigate how content is crafted by engaging with selected tools and strategies (such as narrative, primary sources and critical interpretation) employed by the historian.

     

     

  • Introduction to Theatre, University of Pittsburgh

    An introductory theatre class for non-majors and a core course for majors. Key theatre concepts and terms, as well as historical and artistic contexts.  Lecture/discussion.

  • Introduction to Theatre, University of Washington

    Drama 101 is an introductory investigation into the practices and history of Western theatre. You will read plays, see plays, discuss plays, write about plays, and work practically with plays.  Foundational lectures will be augmented by section activities and assignments devoted to developing critical and imaginative thinking in discussion, writing, and practical work.

     

    Large lecture format (250 student cap), three 50 minute sessions per week.  Five TA’s lead two additional breakout sections, each, per week.

  • Theatre and Society, University of Washington

    In this course we will examine intersections between theatre, society, performance and culture.  We will focus on representative performance and theatre histories, texts and conventions from Europe and the Americas between the 5th Century B.C.E. and 18th Century C.E.  WE are guided by key questions, including: How do theatre and performance events and practices reflect, produce and/or represent society? How are theatre and performance forms related to culture?  How can historical texts, performances, and conventions maintain relevance in our own society?  How do cultures and societies use theatre and performance to

     

    • represent themselves and others?
    • communicate priorities, fears and histories?
    • understand their place within the world?
    • challenge and/or champion political, social or religious points of view?

     

     

  • Devising Theatre, Virginia Commonwealth University

    This course will introduce students to practical means of creating original works of performance in response to a prompt, a theme, or a text.  In addition to their practical creative work, students will also engage with international contemporary and historical practices devised theatre.  Graduate students (MFA Performance Pedagogy) and undergraduate students (BFA) will take the class together.

     

    Course Objectives:

     

    • Create original non-script based performance pieces from a variety of sources, as individuals and as members of an ensemble.
    • Be able to work outside of and beyond conventional narrative structure, naturalistic staging, and traditional rehearsal processes.
    • Develop an awareness of the history of devised theatre and current artists: the who, how and where.
    • Cultivate an individual point of view and aesthetic.
    • Express story, action, text and subtext through the body.
    • Consider all elements of performance—space, set, costumes light, words, sound, music, the body, the voice, the audience, rhythm, tempo, image-- as languages in creating theatre pieces.
    • Consider the intersection of self, ensemble and society in devised work and its creation.  That is, how devised work has and does confront social and political issues in addition to, or along with, traditional aesthetic values.
    • Be supportive of fellow artists and respect class as a safe place in which we can experiment and take risks.

     

     

  • Play Analysis and Styles, University of Washington

    Historical theatre conventions, as well as social and cultural aesthetic expectations, inform every text’s composition, structure and staging. Understanding the specific circumstances surrounding a text’s origins helps us make informed and incisive production choices and critiques.

     

    We will address play structure across approximately 2,500 years of predominantly Western theatre history with special attention to the organizational aspects of plot.  Script analysis—the breaking down of how a play is put together-- will be accompanied by interpretation—what a play means and how it communicates that meaning to an audience.   Our work will also be informed by the historical contexts that contributed to the writer’s work and the play’s “style.”  For our purposes, discussions of style will entail the analysis of the subject-viewer relationship in each playtext according to a broad understanding of pre-modern, modern, and post-modern aesthetics.

  • Voice and Speech I, Virginia Commonwealth University

    An introductory voice and speech class for BFA sophomores. Emphasis on self awareness, breath, support of full voice across resonators, body-voice connection, and beginning application to text. Linklater, Roy Hart, and Rodenberg based.

  • Voice and Speech II, Virginia Commonwealth University

    An intermediate voice and speech class for BFA sophomores. Continues the work of Voice and Speech I with an emphasis on expanding range and articulation.  Includes IPA and dialect work, as well as beginning character voice work.

  • Voice and Classical Text , Virginia Commonwealth University

    An advanced voice and speech class for BFA juniors.  Builds on the work of voice and speech I and II with a continued emphasis on developing breath, range, and articulation to meet the demands of Shakespeare’s text both technically and emotionally.   Linklater and Rodenberg serve as primary texts.

  • Creating the One Woman Show, Virginia Commonwealth University

    Students research, develop, and devise a one woman show.  Assignments include independent, student-artist driven research and development with periodic referrals by the instructor to additional materials. Other assignments will include rehearsals and rehearsal logs. At the end of the semester the student-artist will publicly show a 10 minute one woman piece.

Undergraduate Courses

“Remember history.  Teach it.  Learn it.  Honor it.  Be passionate about your theory and your politics, and communicate that passion widely.  Believe in things, and share your beliefs faithfully.”

 

- Jill Dolan, Geographies of Learning

 

Theatre Arts Department

University of Pittsburgh

1617 Cathedral of Learning

Pittsburgh, PA 15260

 (412) 624-6659

lisajsch@pitt.edu

Copyright © 2017 Lisa Jackson-Schebetta